#51: Diving into the Omega Seamaster 300

Omega_Seamaster_300_2913_3.jpg

With the heavy media focus on the Moonwatch and the 50th Anniversary of Apollo 11 this year, you could be forgiven for thinking that Omega produce nothing but manual wind chronographs, and that the only exploration they have been involved with required rockets and spacesuits.

Equally, glancing at the ongoing surge in vintage, and limited edition modern Speedmaster prices, it seems that some collectors feel that if it wasn’t on the wrist of Aldrin, Armstrong, or Collins (or related to a watch they wore), that it’s not really worth hunting down.

Pure lunacy.

Today’s guest has pushed through the Moonwatch phase of his collecting madness, and donned mask, flippers, and snorkel, to explore the depths of Omega’s vast vintage catalogue.

His focus pulled from Omega watches that splashed down into the ocean on the wrists of engineers, scientists and explorers, to Omega watches that went deep under the oceans surface on the wrists of engineers, scientists, and explorers.

Horological tools that couldn’t be more different.

Although those cases do look incredibly similar...


Watches discussed on this episode:

  • Omega Seamaster 2913-3

  • Omega Seamaster 165.014-63

  • Omega Seamaster 165.024

  • Omega Seamaster 165.024 “Big Triangle”


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Creative Commons credit to Cityfires for the use of Map of Time theme song that you hear in the podcast.